Get your kids a free bike helmet this weekend in Austin

Kid’s don’t have a bike helmet? Now’s the time to get one. (Plus, it’s also the law for kids in Austin to have a bike helmet when they ride.)

RELATED: HOW TO BUY A BIKE FOR YOUR CHILD

 A group of students and parents wait for the “bike train” to Brentwood Elementary School. Mark Matson for American-Statesman 2013

St. David’s Children’s Hospital is hosting a Kids Fest and Safety Fair 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. There your kids can get fitted for a bike helmet as well as get one free. They also can bring their bikes to make sure that their bike is safe.

St. David’s Children’s Hospital also will have safety information and demonstrations, games, prizes and more. Kids can even come in Halloween costume.

St. David’s North Austin Medical Center, 12221 N. MoPac Blvd. It’s all free.

Why are bike helmets so important?

Here’s one statistic from 2012: Nationally, for every $12 spent on a helmet for a child younger than 14, $580 is saved in health care cost from injuries, according to SafeKids Worldwide.

And as  Dr. Patrick Crocker, former director of emergency medicine at Dell Children’s Medical Center, said, “We have found a 50 percent reduction in head injury if they are wearing a helmet.”

One national study found an 85 percent reduction for head injury and 88 percent for severe brain injury. In 2009, 91 percent of bicyclists killed nationally were not wearing a helmet.

Stewart Williams, who was injury prevention manager for trauma services at Dell Children’s Medical Center, said of the 74 children who came into trauma services with bicycle-related injuries in 2011, only 14 percent were wearing helmets.

Get the helmet, and then make them wear it!

Plan your rainy weekend with these family events, Oct. 20-22

Brace for it. It’s going to rain this weekend, with an 80 percent chance on Friday and Sunday and a 50 percent change on Saturday. We know you want to head out to the pumpkin patches around Central Texas. Plan wisely, bring your rain gear, and hope that the weather forecasters get this one wrong. The good news: It won’t be hot.

Barton Hill Farms in Bastrop has a maze and pumpkins galore to buy. Barton Hill Farms

Friday

Thinkery. Little Thinkers Club. Get Into Shapes. 9:45 a.m. for 2-year-olds, 10:45 a.m. for 3-year-olds, Fridays through Friday. $20.  Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. thinkeryaustin.org

Literature Live Presents: “Strega Nona.” 2:15 p.m. Friday, St. John Branch.

The Austin Zoo puts on Boo at the Zoo this month. DEBORAH CANNON / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Friday-Saturday

Boo at the Zoo. Dress up and enjoy the zoo with Halloween-themed activities. 6:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays in October. $17.50. Austin Zoo, 10808 Rawhide Trail. austinzoo.org

Friday-Sunday

Sweet Berry Farm. Hay rides, corn mazes, pick your own pumpkins and more. 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 1-5 p.m. Sunday, through Nov. 8. Pay per activity. 1801 FM 1980, ​Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com

Elgin Christmas Tree Farm Fall Farm Fun. Explore a corn maze, hay bale maze and a crazy maze, plus go on a hay ride, visit animals and get a mini pumpkin to decorate. Big pumpkins to purchase. $7. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, noon-5:30 p.m. Sunday. Elgin Christmas Tree Farm, 120 Nature’s Way, Elgin. elginchristmastreefarm.com

Peppa the Pig visits the Toybrary on Saturday.

Saturday

St. David’s Children’s Hospital Kids Fest and Safety Fair. Bike helmets fittings and giveaways, plus safety information, games, prizes and more. Bring your bicycles for a safety check. Come in Halloween costume. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. St. David’s North Austin Medical Center, 12221 N. MoPac Blvd. Free.

Baby Bloomers. Learn about fall on the farm. For infant to 3. 9 a.m. Saturdays. Special guests throughout the month. $5. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. thinkeryaustin.org

Monarch Appreciation Day. Activities including crafts that are all about the butterfly. Free with admission. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. Zilker Botanical Garden, 2220 Barton Springs Road. austintexas.gov

Toybrary Austin. Date night babysitting. For ages 1-5. $25 first child, $10 siblings. 5-8 p.m. Saturdays. Peppa Pig visits. 10:30 a.m. Saturday. Toybrary Austin, 2001 Justin Lane. toybraryaustin.com

“Goosebumps” with introduction by R.L. Stine. 4 p.m. Saturday, Mueller Alamo Drafthouse. drafthouse.com

Zach Theatre presents “The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe.” Head to Narnia in the C.S. Lewis tale. 11 a.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Saturday. More shows through Feb. 10. $18-$24. Whisenhunt Stage, 1510 Toomey Road. zachtheatre.org

“Shopkins Live! Shop It Up.” Your favorite toys come to life on the stage. $29.50-$59.50. 2 p.m. Saturday. Long Center, 701 Riverside Drive. thelongcenter.org

BookPeople Story times: Paramount Theatre Pinkalicious, 11:30 a.m. Saturday. BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd. bookpeople.com

Barnes & Noble 11 a.m. Saturdays story times at all locations: “Good Day, Good Night,” Saturday.

Saturday-Sunday

Robinson Family Farm Pumpkin Patch. Go through a corn maze, go on a hay ride, pet the goats and pick a pumpkin. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through Oct. 29. Free, but pay for activities and pumpkins. 3780 White Owl Lane, Temple. therobinsonfamilyfarm.com

Barton Hill Farms. Corn maze, farm animals and more than 30 activities, plus pumpkin picking. 10 a.m.-8 pm. Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sundays, through Nov. 5. $14, extra for pumpkins and face painting. 1115 FM 969, Bastrop. bartonhillfarms.com

Evergreen Christmas Tree Farm Pumpkin Hunt. Go hunting pumpkins, launch pumpkins, train ride, maze, mini golf, fishing pond pony rides and bounce house. $2.50 for each activity. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays and 1-5 p.m. Sundays in October. 242 Monkey Road. evergreen-farms.com

Fall Family Fun Days. Enjoy raptor shows, snake shows, sheep shearing, corn shucking, apple cider making, live music, and lots of local vendors selling everything from fresh organic produce, eggs, honey, jam, and bread and more. $9-$3. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays in October. Crowe’s Nest Farm, 10300 Taylor Lane. crowesnestfarm.org

Whisks and Wizards. Make Halloween-themed food. For ages 4 and up. 10:30 a.m., noon, 2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. $8. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. thinkeryaustin.org

“Rosita y Conchita.” ee this bilingual Día de los Muertos play about two sisters who try to reunite. $8-$12. 11 a.m. Sunday and Saturday; 1 p.m. Sunday and Saturday. Scottish Rite Theater, 207 W. 18th St. scottishritetheater.org

Emily Ann Theatre presents “Thumbelina.” See this classic children’s tale on stage. $8-$10. 10 a.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. 1101 Ranch Road 2325, Wimberley.

Ballet Austin’s “Not Afraid of the Dark.” See glowing ballet in the dark. $15. 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Sunday and Saturday. Ballet Austin Studio Theater, 501 W. Third St. balletaustin.org

Ballet Austin brings back its charming ‘Not Afraid of the Dark.’ Contributed

Sunday

Sensory Friendly Hours. Play from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sunday, then head to the Alamo Drafthouse at Mueller for a sensory friendly screening of “Trolls” at 10:30 a.m. Made possible for free by Variety, but reserve your theater seat with a $5 voucher for food and drink. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. thinkeryaustin.orgdrafthouse.com

BookPeople events. Events: Will Kostakis and Adi Alsaid read and sign “The Sidekicks” and “North of Happy.” 6 p.m. Sunday. 603 N. Lamar Blvd. bookpeople.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learn more about where we are in curing Alzheimer’s

Ever wonder if we’re making any progress in treatment for Alzheimer’s disease? We wrote about that a few weeks ago, but next week, you can hear a symposium of information on what progress we’ve made and what’s on the horizon.

 

Connie Andrews and Corrina Barrick dance together during The Gathering, an Alzheimer’s respite at Westlake Hills Presbyterian Church.
Shelby Tauber / AMERICAN-STATESMAN 2015

MD Anderson’s head of neuroscience Jim Ray will lead a free expert panel discussion with Delia Jervier, executive director of Alzheimer’s Association Capital of Texas Chapter; Beverly Sanborn, gerontologist and vice president of program development of Belmont Village Senior Living; and a family caregiver.

6-8 p.m. Wednesday

Belmont Village West Lake Hills, 4310 Bee Cave Road

Free, but registration is rquired at 512-347-1700 or eventswlh@belmontvillage.com.

Need something to do with all that Halloween candy? Send it to a soldier

The Halloween candy is coming. Soon your house will be filled with it. Do your kids really need it all?

Many dentists and orthodontists offices “buy” back their patient’s candy, but you also can donate candy to be sent to people serving in our armed forces.

Soldiers’ Angels, a nonprofit organization based in San Antonio, has a program for businesses to collect leftover Halloween candy and send it to troops.

When this orange plastic pumpkin is more like five or six pumpkins, send your candy to a soldier.
Thinkstock

You can find out which businesses are participating close to you at SoldiersAngels.org/TreatsforTroops as well as sign up your business to collect candy and send it. This year, Soldiers’ Angels wants to collect 17,000 pounds of candy.

When we searched the site we found two local businesses to send our candy, but we’re sure there will be more as we get closer to Halloween.

myDental
13000 N. Interstate 35
Austin, TX 78753
Phone: 512-815-2524
Email: myDental.outreach@gmail.com
Days We Accept Candy Donations: Monday-Saturday
Drop Off Times: 10 a.m.- 6:30 p.m.
Drop Off Dates: Through Nov. 3
myDentalTX.com
Williamson County Association of REALTORS
123 Old Settlers Blvd.
Round Rock, TX 78665
Phone: 512-422-8088
Email: elaine_byrne@yahoo.com
Days We Accept Candy Donations: Monday-Friday
Drop Off Times: 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Drop Off Dates: Through Nov. 30.
www.WCREALTORS.com

Skip these medical tests the next time you’re at the doctor’s

The Choosing Wisely campaign has folks thinking about which medical tests are necessary.

Today the American Academy of Pediatrics talks about a few tests that have to do with kids who are short.

Choosing Wisely has a list of tests you should question for different ages and specialities. photos.com 

Here’s the list of five tests you should think twice about from the Academy and Choosing Wisely:

1.       Hormone tests for children with pubic hair and/or body odor but no other signs of puberty. The AAP advises against these tests when development of pubic or axillary hair and/or underarm odor aren’t accompanied by other physical signs of sexual maturation such as breast development in girls, or rapid growth.

2.       Screening tests to detect chronic disease or endocrine disorders in healthy children growing at or above the 3rd percentile with a normal growth rate. Even in children below the 3rdpercentile for height with a normal history and physical exam, these tests only reveal new, underlying conditions about 1 percent of the time. In patients with significantly short stature or who are well below their genetic potential based on the height of their parents, the AAP advises tiered or sequential screening.

3.       Routine vitamin D screening in otherwise healthy children, including those who are overweight or obese. Vitamin D deficiency screening is only advised for patients with disorders linked with low bone mass, such as rickets, or a history of repeated, low-trauma bone fractures. Vitamin D supplements are a cost-effective option for children with insufficient dietary intake or for obese children, who often have low vitamin D levels.

4.       Thyroid function and/or insulin levels tests in children with obesity. Testing thyroid function in obese children should be considered only if the growth rate is below what it should be, or if there are other signs of a thyroid problem. Measuring insulin levels in obese children does not affect how doctors treat them.

5.       Routine thyroid ultrasounds in children who have simple goiters or autoimmune thyroiditis. The AAP advises limiting this test to children who have significantly enlarged thyroid glands, swelling on just one side of the neck, or nodules that can be felt through the skin during a physical exam. Overuse of ultrasonography can cause needless anxiety for patients and parents, waste families’ time and health care dollars.

You can find other tests in other specialties at choosingwisely.org.

 

 

How to talk to your kids about sexual harassment in wake of Harvey Weinstein scandal

Update: Friday, Harvey Weinstein was arrested, arraigned and out on bail for rape charges involving two women in New York City. More could be coming. He’ll be in the news again.

If you are having conversations with your kids, especially those that are of dating age about Harvey Weinstein or any of the accused men brought to light by the #MeToo movement, here are some tips we offered last fall, when the Harvey Weinstein accusations first surfaced:

Shame on you, Harvey Weinstein.

That’s been the rallying cry for the last few weeks from a lot of people on social media, on TV news programs and beyond.

The allegations of sexual assault and the possibility of the Weinstein Co. having a culture of looking the other way and possibly helping to arrange encounters, sickened us.

Harvey Weinstein faces multiple allegations of sexual abuse and harassment from some of the biggest names in Hollywood. Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision

How do we prevent this from happening again? How do we prepare our daughters to handle that moment when someone wants to use their position of power over them? How do we prepare our sons to not be a Harvey Weinstein when they grow up? How to we prepare both our sons and daughters to stand up to this behavior even if it’s directed toward someone else but witnessed by them?

“For a long time we have siloed the conversation to be relevant to girls,” says Alexis Jones, founder of the empowerment group I Am That Girl, as well as ProtectHer, which offers sexual assault education in high school and college sports locker rooms, as well as in corporate settings. “This isn’t a girls’ issue; this isn’t a women’s issue, this is a human issue. We need to better educate young humans.”

She tells the boys in the locker rooms she goes into: “We are not criminalizing men,” Jones says. “We actually believe you guys are the cure.”

She gives them guidance on what to say in the moment that they see sexual harassment happening. “When they see this, what real manhood means is you step up in the moment.”

Jones says we need to armor both boys and girls with the language to use when something happens, whether it’s about gender, gender preference, skin color, religion or something else that makes them different.

She likes the phrase: “We don’t do that.” When someone is asking you to do something you don’t want to do, when they say something inappropriate whether it’s directed to you or you witness it: “We don’t do that.”

“You’re better than that” also works. She’s used that herself when a co-worker made an inappropriate joke. It caused him to pause, then apologize.

Alexis Jones founded I am That Girl and ProtectHer. DEBORAH CANNON / AMERICAN-STATESMAN 2014

Jones experienced a lot of inappropriate advances and jokes in her career in sports journalism and later entertainment. She remembers telling an A-list star on the red carpet who said something inappropriate, “Do you know who I am?” It showed her strength, it had him guessing if she was famous or related to someone famous. It brought the power back to her.

Barri Rosenbluth, the senior director of the Expect Respect program at SAFE (Stopping Abuse For Everyone), tells us that one of the most important things we can do is model at home respecting their boundaries. “They should already have an expectation that no one has a right to mistreat them physically or sexually,” she says.

If your child is about to enter the workforce or already in the workforce, it’s time to talk about their rights in the workplace. Rosenbluth tells us to remind kids that just like in school, it’s illegal. It’s also not uncommon. If it happens to them, they need to know they are not the only ones.

Parents should talk to kids about what sexual harassment looks like, feels like. Explain the difference between flirting and sexual harassment. Flirting, Rosenbluth says, is mutual and it builds the relationship. Sexual harassment is not mutual, it doesn’t build the relationship. It makes you feel uncomfortable, scared or intimidated.

Also explain to your children that sexual harassment doesn’t have to come from a manager or supervisor. It can come from a co-worker, and it doesn’t have to be physical. It can be personal stories that are too personal, it could be pornography, making comments about how you look or dress, as well as any kind of request of a sexual act that you’re not comfortable with.

If at anytime they are afraid for their safety, they should protect themselves and call 911, or if it’s not an immediate threat, they should avoid being alone with that person.

Parents might think that this is a hard conversation to have with their kids who are about to enter the workforce, but it’s probably not new to them, Rosenbluth says. They have probably seen it at school, too.

Rosenbluth encourages parents to coach their kids on how to get their employer’s policies on sexual harassment. If they have to, parents can even ask for it themselves. Make sure kids know what to do and where to go if they witness it or experience it. Ask your child’s employer what kind of training employees are receiving on this.

If they do experience it, they should tell the person to stop. If they can’t, they should go to a supervisor or the supervisor’s boss to tell them what is happening.

They should document it. Keep texts, emails, voice mails. Write down what happened and when it happened. Ask anyone who witnessed it to document it as well. That becomes useful if it doesn’t stop and they need to make a formal complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. They can do so online at eeoc.gov. The commission also has a guide for teen workers that can be helpful. Find it at eeoc.gov/youth.

Keep teens safe while driving with these helpful tips

Insurance company USAA gives us a list of 10 things to keep teen safe while driving, but really these are good tips for any driver.

  1. Don’t try to multitask. Avoid these nine distractions while driving:

    Student driver Morgan Stewart takes her third test drive with driving instructor Zane Bush, left, in 2013. Student drivers have to complete at least seven on the road driving test drives during driving school. (RICARDO B. BRAZZIELL / AMERICAN- STATESMAN)
  • Talking on the phone even if hands-free. Teen drivers younger than 18 can’t legally talk on the phone while driving even with a hands-free device.
  • Text messaging.
  • Tweaking your GPS settings.
  • Grooming. That means no putting on makeup, brushing your hair, picking your nose, etc.
  • Retrieving dropped items. Let it go. You can get it later.
  • Driving unruly passengers. That’s why teen drivers aren’t allowed to have more than one person in the car with them who is under 21 unless a family member.
  • Letting the dog onto your lap. 
  • Rubbernecking. Don’t try to figure out what happened in that accident. Just mind your own driving.

RELATED: HOW TO GET YOUR CHILD A DRIVER’S LICENSE

  1. Don’t text and drive.
  2. Don’t always assume that green means go. Look out for the driver who runs a red light.
  3. Don’t drive when you’re tired. Pull off the road, take a pit stop, get a soda, get some fresh air.
  4. Don’t ignore the weather. Double or triple the space you normally leave between you and the car in front of you in wet weather.
  5. Minimize whiplash in case of an accident by adjusting your car’s headrest to a height behind your head – not your neck.
  6. Keep your hands at 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock on the steering wheel.
  7. Be mindful of manufacturer recalls. Look up your vehicle by vehicle identification number at this site https://www.safercar.gov/Vehicle-Owners/Check-For-Recalls/CheckForRecalls
  8. Watch out for motorcyclists. They are hard to see and are in your blind spot often. (We’d also add bicyclists and pedestrians).
  9. Keep an emergency kit in your car. Have supplies should your car become disabled or you become injured.

Celebrate fall (even if it’s 90 degrees) with the kids this weekend in Austin, Oct. 13-15

We’re going to be close to 90 degrees this weekend, until we get to a possible rain shower on Sunday. Bring your sunscreen, your bug spray and head out for these family activities.

Friday

Thinkery. Little Thinkers Club. Get Into Shapes. 9:45 a.m. for 2-year-olds, 10:45 a.m. for 3-year-olds, Fridays through Oct. 27. $20 per class, $140 for the series. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. thinkeryaustin.org

Sprouts. Hands-on preschool program. 10 a.m. Fridays. Wildflower Center, 4801 La Crosse Ave. wildflower.org

That’s My Face: Youth and Young Adult Film Series: “I Am Not Your Negro.” Free. 6:30 p.m. Friday. Carver Museum, 1165 Angelina St. austintexas.gov

Family Movie Night: “Ghostbusters: Answer the Call.” 3:30 p.m. Friday, Old Quarry Branch.

The Austin Zoo puts on Boo at the Zoo next month. DEBORAH CANNON / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Friday-Saturday

Boo at the Zoo. Dress up and enjoy the zoo with Halloween-themed activities. 6:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays in October. $17.50. Austin Zoo, 10808 Rawhide Trail. austinzoo.org

Zoe Wiebusch, 5, of Austin paints on an mural at Austin Kiddie Limits on the final day of the 2016 Austin City Limits Festival. Erika Rich for American-Statesman

Friday-Sunday

Elgin Christmas Tree Farm Fall Farm Fun. Explore a corn maze, hay bale maze and a crazy maze, plus go on a hay ride, visit animals and get a mini pumpkin to decorate. Big pumpkins to purchase. $7. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, noon-5:30 p.m. Sunday. Pumpkin Festival, Oct. Saturday and Sunday, with special activities. Elgin Christmas Tree Farm, 120 Nature’s Way, Elgin. elginchristmastreefarm.com

Sweet Berry Farm. Hay rides, corn mazes, pick your own pumpkins and more. 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 1-5 p.m. Sunday, through Nov. 8. Pay per activity. 1801 FM 1980, ​Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com

Austin Kiddie Limits. Hear kids music, plus build things, make art and dance. Free for kids 10 and younger with parent with a wristband. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday-Sunday. Zilker Park. aclfestival.com/kids

Celebrate trees at Families Create at Contemporary Austin this month. 
RALPH BARRERA/ AMERICAN-STATESMAN 2015

Saturday

Toybrary Austin. Date night babysitting. For ages 1-5. $25 first child, $10 siblings. 5-8 p.m. Saturdays. Staci Gray Outdoor Concert. 6 p.m. Saturday. $10 per child. Toybrary Austin, 2001 Justin Lane. toybraryaustin.com

Baby Bloomers. Learn about fall on the farm. For infant to 3. 9 a.m. Saturday. $5. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. thinkeryaustin.org

Contemporary Austin. Families Create: Tree Tales. Learn more about trees with Tree Folks and make art around it. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Free. Laguna Gloria, 3809 W. 35th St. thecontemporaryaustin.org

Wildflower Center. Nature Nets. See what’s in the ponds. Noon-2 p.m. Saturday. Nature Play Hour. Play in the Family Garden. 11 a.m. Saturdays. Wildflower Center, 4801 La Crosse Ave. wildflower.org

BookPeople: Story times:  Diwali, 11:30 a.m. Saturday. BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd. bookpeople.com

Barnes & Noble 11 a.m. Saturdays story times at all locations: “After the Fall.”

Barking Book Buddies: Mornings with Moxie. 10 a.m. Saturday, Manchaca Road Branch.

The Thinkery makes costumes this weekend at its workshops. Credit: Thinkery

Saturday-Sunday

Robinson Family Farm Pumpkin Patch. Go through a corn maze, go on a hay ride, pet the goats and pick a pumpkin. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through Oct. 29. Free, but pay for activities and pumpkins. 3780 White Owl Lane, Temple. therobinsonfamilyfarm.com

Barton Hill Farms. Corn maze, farm animals and more than 30 activities, plus pumpkin picking. 10 a.m.-8 pm. Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sundays, through Nov. 5. $14, extra for pumpkins and face painting. 1115 FM 969, Bastrop. bartonhillfarms.com

Evergreen Christmas Tree Farm Pumpkin Hunt. Go hunting pumpkins, launch pumpkins, train ride, maze, mini golf, fishing pond, pony rides and bounce house. $2.50 for each activity. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays and 1-5 p.m. Sundays in October. 242 Monkey Road. evergreen-farms.com

Dave Williams feeds the llamas, goats and emus at Crowe’s Nest Farms. Ralph Barrera/AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Fall Family Fun Days. Enjoy raptor shows, snake shows, sheep shearing, corn shucking, apple cider making, live music, and lots of local vendors selling everything from fresh organic produce, eggs, honey, jam, and bread and more. $3-$9. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays in October. Crowe’s Nest Farm, 10300 Taylor Lane. crowesnestfarm.org

Costume Design. Make your own costume. For ages 4 and older. $8. 10:30 a.m., noon, 2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

“Rosita y Conchita.” See this bilingual Día de los Muertos play about two sisters who try to reunite. $8-$12. 11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday; 1 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. Scottish Rite Theater, 207 W. 18th St. scottishritetheater.org

Emily Ann Theatre presents “Thumbelina.” See this classic children’s tale on stage. $8-$10. 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 21; 2 p.m. Sunday. 1101 Ranch Road 2325, Wimberley.

Pollyanna Theatre Company presents “A Moon of my Own.”

Sunday

Alamo Drafthouse events. “The Addams Family” Party. 4 p.m. Sunday, Mueller.  drafthouse.com

Pollyanna Theatre Company presents “A Moon of My Own.” A young girl goes on an adventure with the moon. For kids kindergarten through second grade. 2 p.m. Sunday. $10.50-$13.50. The Long Center, 701 W. Riverside Drive. thelongcenter.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

Will local girls become Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts?

Wednesday’s announcement by Boy Scouts of America to allow girls into its Cub Scout program and create a separate program for girls similar to the Boy Scout program had us wondering what that means for boys and girls locally.

Every February, Eagle Scouts gather for a reception at Frank Fickett Scout Training and Service Center in Austin. They each get called to the front to be recognized. Mark Matson

Charles Mead, director of marketing and public relations at the local Capitol Area Council, Boy Scouts of America, says he’s not aware of any girls who have indicated their interest in becoming a Cub Scout.

He does note that the council wouldn’t necessarily get those requests. Instead, those requests would come to the charter organization — the church or school or other group — that sponsors the local den, pack or troop. Those charter organizations could decide to start Cub Scout dens for girls within their pack, or start a separate pack for girls, or not allow girls to join at all, he says.

Once charter organizations decide what to do, the council will then figure out how to roll out the program to those packs or dens that have girls within them, he says.

When it comes to older scouts, those at the Boy Scout level (after elementary school), those troops don’t have the option of having girls within their troops. They would have to have a separate troop for girls. What that would look like and what those girls and troops would be called has not been decided, Mead says. The council also has not decided what to do when it comes to Scout camps or camping arrangements.

Traditionally Cub Scouts camping is for the whole family, so girls are experiencing that already.

Boy Scouts, Mead says, is trying “to reflect and meet a need demonstrated by families to offer a program that can serve both their sons and daughters.”

The local council is looking for more announcements and guidance from Boy Scouts of America next year. What it will be able to offer girls, though, is “not some watered down offerings for young women,” he says. They will have the same program as the boys and be able to attain the rank of Eagle Scouts like the boys.

RELATED: More boys become Eagle Scouts

Right now through Girl Scouts, girls can become a Silver Girl Scout, which is a similar project to the Eagle Scout project as far as a time commitment, as a middle-schooler and a Gold Girl Scout, which is a more complicated project, as a high-schooler.

RELATED: Learn how local Girl Scouts are going for Gold Award 100 years later

Mead doesn’t believe Boy Scouts’ decision to allow girls to join will hurt the relationship between the Capital Area Council of Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts of Central Texas. “We’ve had a good relationship in the past,” he says. “We don’t see why it would need to change because of this.”

“The Girl Scout Program is excellent,” he says. “They have a very important focus on leadership development. They have really invested a lot of time in the STEM skills program.”

RELATED: Girl Scouts learn STEM skills while lending a hand

In addition to increasing science, technology, engineering and math programming, Girl Scouts also has increased its outdoor offerings in the last three years, and continued to focus on leadership development and entrepreneurship.

Girl Scouts of Central Texas and Capital Area Council of Boy Scouts always have recruited together, says Lolis Garcia-Babb, director of marketing and communications of Girl Scouts of Central Texas. “We both recognize the importance of Scouting,” she says. It’s unknown where that relationship stands after the announcement, she says. She doesn’t understand why Boy Scouts would want to try to recruit girls rather than try to attract more of the 90 percent of boys who are not in Scouts.

Girl Scouts does not have any plans to recruit boys to its program, Garcia-Babb says.

“Girl Scouts remains committed to and believes strongly in the importance of the all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment that Girl Scouts provides, which creates a necessary safe space for girls to learn and thrive,” Girl Scouts of Central Texas said in a statement Wednesday. “The benefit of this type of girl-centered environment has been well-documented by educators, scholars, and other girl- and youth-serving organizations, as well as Girl Scouts themselves. We are dedicated to ensuring that girls are able to take advantage of a program tailored specifically to their unique developmental needs.”

 

Cookie Monster getting a food truck in new ‘Sesame Street’ season

The next season of “Sesame Street” begins Nov. 11 on HBO, followed by a spring debut on PBS. What’s new for the season? Definitely more kindness episodes, more episodes talking about differences and recognizing that people can be different because of race, ethnicity, economics, abilities and more. Last season, “Sesame Street” introduced Julia, a muppet with autism.

RELATED: WE All WIN WHEN “SESAME STREET” INVITES MUPPET WITH AUTISM TO PLAY

Cookie Monster gets a food truck this season on “Sesame Street.” Sesame Street

New this season, Cookie Monster is getting his own food truck (How very Austin of him!). In his food truck, he’ll head to find where ingredients come from. (Yes, eat local!)  For example, in the opening episode, he needs apples, so he heads to an apple orchard. Throughout the season he’ll investigate where cranberries, avocados, tortillas, pineapples, maple syrup, pasta and milk come from.

We look forward to finding out ourselves.

Since at least 2004, Cookie Monster, seen here with Hoots the Owl, has moved beyond cookies to include healthier choices. Sesame Workshop,Richard Termine 2004