It’s Halloween!!! Be safe out there

Tuesday could be a wet one for trick-or-treating. Hopefully, the rain will hold off until after 9 p.m.  and not soak our Halloween fun.

If we are able to head out, keep these safety tips in mind.

Ashley Fair hands out candy to Mya Atkins, 4, during the Hill Country Galleria Trick or Treat event in 2014. RACHEL RICE/LAKE TRAVIS VIEW

Here are some safety tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics; Dr. Avni Shah, Baylor Scott & White pediatrician, and  Dr. Julie Alonso-Katzowitz, a Seton child and adolescent psychiatrist:

Costumes:

  • Plan costumes that are bright and reflective. Make sure that shoes fit well and that costumes are short enough to prevent tripping, entanglement or contact with flame.
  • Consider adding reflective tape or striping to costumes and trick-or-treat bags for greater visibility.
  • Because masks can limit or block eyesight, consider non-toxic makeup and decorative hats as safer alternatives. Hats should fit properly to prevent them from sliding over eyes. Makeup should be tested ahead of time on a small patch of skin to ensure there are no unpleasant surprises.
  • When shopping for costumes, wigs and accessories look for and purchase those with a label clearly indicating they are flame resistant.
  • If a sword, cane, or stick is a part of your child’s costume, make sure it is not sharp or long. A child may be easily hurt by these accessories if he stumbles or trips.
  • Do not use decorative contact lenses without an eye examination and a prescription from an eye care professional. While the packaging on decorative lenses will often make claims such as “one size fits all,” or “no need to see an eye specialist,” obtaining decorative contact lenses without a prescription is both dangerous and illegal. This can cause pain, inflammation, and serious eye disorders and infections, which may lead to permanent vision loss.

Pumpkin carving:

  • Small children should never carve pumpkins. Children can draw a face with markers. Then parents can do the cutting.
  • Consider using a flashlight or glow stick instead of a candle to light your pumpkin. If you do use a candle, a votive candle is safest.
  • Candlelit pumpkins should be placed on a sturdy table, away from curtains and other flammable objects, and not on a porch or any path where visitors may pass close by. They should never be left unattended.

Home safety for trick-0r-treaters:

  • To keep homes safe for visiting trick-or-treaters, parents should remove from the porch and front yard anything a child could trip over such as garden hoses, toys, bikes and lawn decorations.
  • Parents should check outdoor lights and replace burned-out bulbs.
  • Wet leaves or snow should be swept from sidewalks and steps.
  • Restrain pets so they do not inadvertently jump on or bite a trick-or-treater.

Trick-or-treating:

  • A parent or responsible adult should always accompany young children on their neighborhood rounds.
  • Review with children how to call 9-1-1 (or their local emergency number) if they ever have an emergency or become lost.
  • Obtain flashlights with fresh batteries for all children and their escorts.
  • If your older children are going alone, plan and review the route that is acceptable to you. Agree on a specific time when they should return home.
  • Only go to homes with a porch light on and never enter a home or car for a treat.
  • Talk to kids who might be scared about the idea that people are in costumes — that there are real people underneath. Go earlier in the night when the streets will be filled with younger kids who are less likely to be in scary costumes.
  • If kids are scared, only choose homes without scary decorations and don’t force them to trick-or-treat. You can also arrange to only go to a few known houses and call it done.
  • Because pedestrian injuries are the most common injuries to children on Halloween, remind trick-or-treaters:
    • Stay in a group and communicate where they will be going.
    • Remember reflective tape for costumes and trick-or-treat bags.
    • Carry a cellphone for quick communication.
    • Remain on well-lit streets and always use the sidewalk.
    • If no sidewalk is available, walk at the far edge of the roadway facing traffic.
    • Never cut across yards or use alleys.
    • Only cross the street as a group in established crosswalks (as recognized by local custom). Never cross between parked cars or out driveways.
    • Don’t assume the right of way. Motorists may have trouble seeing trick-or-treaters. Just because one car stops, doesn’t mean others will!
    • Law enforcement authorities should be notified immediately of any suspicious or unlawful activity.

Be healthy-ish:

  • A good meal prior to parties and trick-or-treating will discourage youngsters from filling up on Halloween treats.
  • Consider purchasing non-food treats for those who visit your home, such as coloring books or pens and pencils.
  • Wait until children are home to sort and check treats. Though tampering is rare, a responsible adult should closely examine all treats and throw away any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items.
  • Try to ration treats for the days and weeks following Halloween.

Here are a couple of safety tips for California Poison Control:

  1. Glow-in-the-dark jewelry and glow sticks are used by parents to keep their children visible while trick-or-treating in the dark. Children may break open these glow sticks getting the liquid on their hands and in their mouths. The liquid can be mildly irritating to the skin or eyes but is not likely to cause harm if a small amount is ingested.
  2. Children should not eat treats until they return home and all items have been inspected by an adult.
  3. Limit the amount of candy ingested at one time. Too much candy can cause stomach discomfort, and sugars and other sweeteners can act as laxatives when consumed in large amounts.
  4. If a child brings home a brand of candy that is not familiar, throw it away. Some imported candies have high levels of lead that can be harmful.
  5. Candy that is unwrapped should be discarded immediately.
  6. Fruit treats should be washed and cut open before being eaten.
  7. Homemade treats should be discarded unless the individuals who prepared them are well known and trusted.
  8. Little pieces of candy are potential choking hazards for small children.
  9. Torn, loose, or punctured wrapping may be a sign of tampering. Tampering should be reported to local police.
  10. Some Halloween makeup contains lead as do many regular cosmetics. Check www.safecosmetics.org for safe makeup to use on children.

 

Looking for a last-minute costume? We have ideas.

Plus, trick-or-treating tips for kids with food allergies. 

 

Is there a link between pregnancy and stroke? Yes, says new study

A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association’s neurology site looked at the incidence of stroke by age and gender and how it might relate to pregnancy. It looked at patients in New York state who had certain stroke-related billing codes from 2003 to 2012. It divided the women into age groups as well as whether they were pregnant or within six weeks of having been pregnant.

The found a direct relation between pregnancy and stroke, which was even more pronounced the younger the women were. Women ages 12 to 24 had more than double the rate of stroke risk during or right after pregnancy. Those 25-34 had a 60 percent increase of stroke rate.  These are still relatively small numbers though: In the 12-24 group, it was 14 women per 100,000 versus 6.4 per 100,000 for nonpregnant/postpartum women. In the 25-34 age group, 21.2 per 100,000 pregnant or post pregnant women had stroke versus 13.5 per 100,000.

The risk is not significantly different after age 34. In the 35-44 group it was 33 per 100,000 versus 31 per 100,000. And in the 45-54 group, it’s 46.9 pregnant or post-pregnant women with strokes versus 73.7 nonpregnant women with strokes. The risk for stroke goes up with age,  but the pregnancy does not appear to affect it as much in that 35-44 age group. And the oldest group, probably doesn’t have as many pregnancies to begin with, thus limiting the number of stroke patients who have also been pregnant recently or are pregnant.

Dr. Steven Warach is the medical director of Seton's Stroke Institute.
Dr. Steven Warach is the medical director of Seton’s Stroke Institute.

What is significant about this study is that it does find the correlation between pregnancy and younger women who have had stroke. Dr. Steven Warach, who is the medical director of the Seton’s Stroke Institute, explains that the prevailing thinking is that there is a link between estrogen and blood clotting. We know that there is a link between stroke and oral contraception that contains estrogen and stroke and hormone replacement therapies with estrogen in them, he says. Pregnancy and those six weeks of post-pregnancy are a time when a woman’s estrogen levels are high and then in flux.

What the study also found was the type of stroke these women were having. The pregnant or post-pregnant women were having strokes from clots in their veins instead of in their arteries, which is the more common type of stroke.

Of the pregnant or postpartum women who had had strokes, 54.1 percent had had a cesarean delivery, 32.5 percent had had gestational hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia; 14.7 percent had had an infection present, about half of which was the bacterial infection chorioamnionitis.

Why weren’t the numbers higher for pregnant women versus nonpregnant women after age 35? More conventional risk factors such as high blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes start to go up in the regular population. The pregnant women who had had strokes were less likely to have those risk factors, though.

Warach emphasizes that having a stroke during or after pregnancy is still a rare thing, as is strokes in younger women, but it can happen. He reminds of the importance of good prenatal care starting early in the pregnancy so that risk factors such as gestational diabetes and preeclampsia can be monitored. Pregnant or women who are post-pregnancy should be getting help immediately if they notice any change in neurological function or a severe headache. Time is of the essence with a stroke.

Remember the FAST acronym:

Face drooping to one side. Ask a person to smile.

Arm weakness. One arm is weaker than the other or is numb. Ask a person to raise both arms. Does one drift downward?

Speech difficulty. Is their speech slurred? Are they unable to speak? Can they repeat a sentence correctly and clearly.

Time to call 9-1-1. If they have any of these symptoms, even if they go away, call 9-1-1 and get them to the hospital.

 

New American Academy of Pediatrics sleeping recommendations for infants: share a room, not a bed with parents

Earlier this week, we wrote about the new screen time recommendations the American Academy of Pediatrics presented at its national conference.

Babies should always sleep alone, on their back and in a safe empty crib with a firm mattress. There should be no missing slats on the crib and they should be no more than 2 3/8 inches apart (about the width of a soda can).
Babies should always sleep alone, on their back and in a safe empty crib with a firm mattress. Now placing the crib inside Mom or Dad’s room is recommended.

Another big recommendation the academy made at that conference is infants should sleep in the same room as their parents for at least six months, preferably a year, but not in the same bed. Instead, they should sleep in a co-sleeper unit that is a separate sleeping space such as a bassinet or a crib. For a while, the academy has been warning against babies sleeping on soft surfaces like a chair, adult bed or couch.  This new policy statement reiterates that and goes even further with the idea that babies should be in safe spaces in parent’s rooms not down the hall. About 3,500 babies a year die from a sleep-related death.

The recommendations for a safe sleep environment:

  • Place the baby on his or her back on a firm sleep surface such as a crib or bassinet with a tight-fitting sheet.
  • Avoid use of soft bedding, including crib bumpers, blankets, pillows and soft toys. The crib should be bare.
  • Share a bedroom with parents, but not the same sleeping surface, preferably until the baby turns 1 but at least for the first six months. Room-sharing decreases the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome by as much as 50 percent.
  • Avoid baby’s exposure to smoke, alcohol and illicit drugs.

Earlier this year, a study found that 93 percent of parents were putting their babies to sleep in unsafe places.  The study video taped families and found that even if a baby started out in a safe place, they ended up in unsafe places as the night went on. Often, they were resting with parents. The other red flag was the amount of stuff parents had in the baby’s crib or bassinet.

Another new study also questioned the safety of swaddling blankets. You see, at some point, babies are able to wiggle out of the blanket, and the blanket could become stuck over their mouths or around their necks before they are strong enough to push it away or turn their heads. There’s also a danger of a baby getting too hot with a swaddling blanket.

Austin doctor Ari Brown of 411 Pediatrics has been at the conference, hearing the new recommendations. One of the things discussed there was not allowing babies to fall asleep in a car seat, swing, Rock ‘n Play, or other non-sleep-approved device. It might seem so easy to let the sleeping baby stay where they are asleep, but there is concern that very young infants might fall asleep in these devices in such a way that their head is collapsing on their neck, cutting off airflow. And very young babies can’t lift their necks to protect themselves.

While babies might crave the closeness, secure-feeling and movement the Rock ‘n Play and car seat gives them, they really just need a flat surface with nothing in it but a tight-fitting sheet.

 

 

Get ready for a spooky weekend for Austin families, Oct. 28-30

This is one of those great weekends for families in Austin. So much is happening — a lot of it geared toward Halloween. Take a look at our list.

Friday

Bullock Museum. Spooktacular. Come dressed in costume and enjoy spooky science, “Toy Story of Terror” and ghosts of the pirate ship La Belle. 5 p.m. Friday. Bullock Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave. thestoryoftexas.com.

Family Night: Halloween Hootenanny. Many Halloween activities for the whole family to try. 6-9 p.m. Friday. $13-$15. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. Thinkeryaustin.org.

BookPeople events. Jay Asher reads “What Light,” 7 p.m. Friday. BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd. bookpeople.com.

Día de los Muertos. 10:30 a.m. Friday, Faulk Central Library.

Texas Museum of Science & Technology Star Party. Look at the stars in the parking lot. 8 p.m. Fridays. Texas Museum of Science & Technology, 1220 Toro Grande Drive, Cedar Park. txmost.org

Friday-Saturday

The Austin Zoo puts on Boo at the Zoo next month. DEBORAH CANNON / AMERICAN-STATESMAN
The Austin Zoo puts on Boo at the Zoo. DEBORAH CANNON / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Boo at the Zoo. Dress up and enjoy the zoo with Halloween-themed activities. 6:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays in October. $15. Austin Zoo, 10808 Rawhide Trail. austinzoo.org

Recreation Center Halloween Carnivals. 3:30 p.m. Friday, Cantu; 6 p.m. Friday, Dottie Jordan; 1 p.m. Saturday, Delores Duffie; 6 p.m. Saturday, Dittmar.

Friday-Sunday

"The Man Who Planted Trees" is at Stateside at the Paramount.
“The Man Who Planted Trees” is at Stateside at the Paramount.

“The Man Who Planted Trees.” Based on the book by Jean Giono, this play shows you what a man and his dog can do. 7 p.m. Friday, 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $22. Stateside at the Paramount, 713 Congress Ave. austintheatre.org.

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

Saturday 

Thinkery. Baby Bloomers for kids infant to 3. Learn about five little pumpkins, 9 a.m. Saturday. Special guests throughout the month. $4.50. Whisks & Wizards for kids 4 and older. Create magic in the kitchen. 11:15 a.m., 1:15 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Saturday. $8 child, $8 adult.  Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. Thinkeryaustin.org.

“The Mad Hatter’s Halloween Disaster!” Join Alex Garza and Pegasus Plays Theatre as he performs his original new adventure, based on the characters created by Lewis Carroll. $5. 1 and 3 p.m. Saturday. City Theatre, 3823 Airport Blvd., Suite D. madhattergarza.brownpapertickets.com

Saturday Movie Matinee. “Goosebumps,” 2 p.m. Saturday, University Hills Branch.

Monstober: Socktober Fest; 2 p.m. Saturday, Ruiz Branch.

BookPeople Story times. Monster Mash, 11:30 a.m. Saturday. BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd. bookpeople.com.

Barnes & Noble 11 a.m. Saturday story times at all locations: “If you Give a Mouse a Brownie.”

Saturday and Sunday

"Charlotte's Web" is at Zach Theatre through Dec. 3. Winnie Hsia from Sky Candy plays Charlotte. Kirk Tuck
“Charlotte’s Web” is at Zach Theatre through Dec. 3. Winnie Hsia from Sky Candy plays Charlotte. Kirk Tuck

“Charlotte’s Web.” Aerial artists Sky Candy bring the spider to life. 2 p.m. Saturday nd Sunday; 11 a.m. Saturday. $16-$21. Zach Theatre’s Kleberg Theatre, 1421 W. Riverside Drive. zachtheatre.org.

The Alamo Drafthouse. “PBS Kids: Halloween Special.” 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, Lakeline and Slaughter Lane. Reserve tickets for $1-$3 donation online. drafthouse.com.

Barton Hill Farms fall festival. Find a lot to do including the maze in the shape of Lonesome Dove, live music, pumpkin painting, train rides and more. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday through Nov. 13. $11 adults, $8 3-10 years old, free for children 2 and younger. $1 off online. Barton Hill Farms, 1115 FM 969, Bastrop. bartonhillfarms.com.

Sunday

rosita“Rosita y Conchita.” See this bilingual Día de los Muertos play about two sisters who try to reunite. $8-$12. Sunday. Scottish Rite Theater, 207 W. 18th St. scottishritetheater.org.

BookPeople events. Amie Kaufman, Jay Kristoff, Kiersten White and Jessica Cluess read “Gemina,” “And I Darken,” “A Shadow Bright” and “Burning,” 2 p.m. Sunday.  BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd. bookpeople.com

Pecan Street Brass. 2 p.m. Sunday, Recycled Reads Bookstore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zilker Tree, Turkey Trot, Chuy’s Parade: So much to do in November for Austin families

Fill up your family dance card with these fun family events in November:

Events

GENAustin, often known for it's school programs and We Are Girls conference, showed here, is
Girls Empowerment Network offers the We Are Girls Conference Nov. 5.

We Are Girls Conference For girls third through eighth grades and their parents. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Nov. 5. Austin High School, 1715 W. Cesar Chavez St. $30. genaustin.org

Barton Hill Farms fall festival. Find a lot to do including the maze in the shape of Lonesome Dove, live music, pumpkin painting, train rides and more. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. Through Nov. 13. $11 adults, $8 3-10 years old, free for children 2 and younger. $1 off online. Barton Hill Farms, 1115 FM 969, Bastrop. bartonhillfarms.com.

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

Elgin Christmas Tree Farm. Hayride, pick your own tree, crazy maze, playground and more. Open for the season beginning 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Nov. 25-Dec. 21. 120 Nature’s Way, Elgin. elginchristmastreefarm.com

Evergreen Christmas Tree Farm. Cut your own tree and then play old-fashioned games or roast marshmallows. 10 a.m. to dark Nov. 25-Dec. 24. 242 Monkey Road, Elgin. evergreen-farms.com

Santa on the Terrace. Get your picture taken with Santa with Austin as a backdrop. Free. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 25. Long Center. 701 Riverside Drive. thelongcenter.org.

Turkey Trot Kids K. $8-$10 a kid. 8:15 a.m. Nov. 24. Long Center, 701 Riverside Drive. thundercloud.com/turkey-trot/event-info/

Jasper Czysz, 4, holds onto his Hot Wheels toy he is ready to donate, but first watches the annual Chuy's Children Giving to Children Parade. RALPH BARRERA/ AMERICAN-STATESMAN
Jasper Czysz, 4, holds onto his Hot Wheels toy he is ready to donate, but first watches the annual Chuy’s Children Giving to Children Parade.
RALPH BARRERA/ AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Chuy’s 28th Children Giving to Children Parade. Line the streets of Congress Avenue from the Capitol to Cesar Chavez Street to see this holiday parade. Bring an unwrapped gift for Operation Blue Santa. Free. 11 a.m. Nov. 26. chuysparade.com

Zilker Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony. Take a spin under the tree for the first time of the season. 6 p.m. Nov. 27. The tree will be lighted 6 p.m.-midnight Nov. 27-Dec. 31. Zilker Park. austintexas.gov/zilkerholidaytree

Museums

Bullock Museum. Living History Days. See history come to life. 10 a.m. Nov. 3. Free First Sunday. Learn about American Indian heritage in Texas with art, traditional dance and music and folklore. Noon-3 p.m. Nov. 6. Free. Little Texans. Drop in and play for ages 2 to 5. 10 a.m. Nov. 10. Family Workshop. See the play “Stille Nacht,” about the rise of Nazism, and write about it. It’s all tied to the exhibit “State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda.” For kids 10 and up. 1 p.m. Nov. 13. Science Thursdays. Hands-on activities from Central Texas Discover Engineering including boat races. 10 a.m. Nov. 17. Bullock Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave. thestoryoftexas.com.

Neill-Cochran House Museum. Sunday Funday: Getting the Message — The Telegraph and the Crystal Radio. Learn about when the Cochran family installed their first phone. 1-4 p.m. Nov. 6. Free. Neill-Cochran House, 2310 San Gabriel St. nchmuseum.org.

Thinkery. Sensory friendly hours. Experience a quieter Thinkery.2-6 p.m. Nov. 7. Take a Look at Me! Look in the mirror and make a self-portrait. 9:45 a.m. Nov. 21 for 1-year-olds; 10:45 a.m. Nov. 21 for ages 2-year-olds; 11:45 a.m. Nov. 21 for 3-year-olds. $20 one child and adult. Little Thinkers Club: Art Start: Nature as our Canvas. 9:45 a.m. Wednesdays for 1-year-olds, 10:45 a.m. Wednesdays for 2-year-olds through Nov. 16. $20 per class. Tinkering Tots: Make it Move. 9:45 a.m. Fridays for 2-year-olds; 10:45 a.m. Fridays for 3-year-olds through Nov. 18. $20 a class. Baby Bloomers for kids infant to 3. Learn about making things move. 9 a.m. Mondays and Saturdays. Special guests throughout the month. $4.50. Owl Pellets Investigation. For 4 and older. 11:15 a.m., 1:15 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Nov. 12-13, Nov. 26-27. $8 child, $8 adult. Storytelling with Ozobots. For 4 and older. Learn code through a robot you create. 11:15 a.m. Nov. 5-6, 19-21. $8 child, $8 adult. NXT Mindstorms. For 8 and up. Play with Lego Mindstorms robots. 1:15 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Nov. 12-13, Nov. 26-27. $8 child, $8 adult. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. Thinkeryaustin.org.

Austin Nature & Science Center. Fall Festival. Meet Texas wildlife, see a planetarium, learn how to leave no trace and more. 9 a.m. to noon Nov. 5. Austin Nature & Science Center, 2389 Stratford Drive. austintexas.gov

Contemporary Austin. Families Create! Miffy’s Friends. Study rabbit sculpture “Miffy’s Fountains,” and learn more about rabbits before making your own sculpture. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Nov. 12. Free. Laguna Gloria, 3809 W. 35th St. thecontemporaryaustin.org.

Texas Museum of Science & Technology Star Party. Every Friday in November, look at the stars in the parking lot. 8 p.m. Fridays. Science Saturday with themed activities on the Foundations of Cognitive Applications. 4-6 p.m. Nov. 19. Texas Museum of Science & Technology, 1220 Toro Grande Drive, Cedar Park. txmost.org.

Bianca Serra, 4, visited the Umlauf Sculpture Garden with her family where she prayed with a bronze statue of a nun. LAURA SKELDING / AMERICAN-STATESMAN
Bianca Serra, 4, visited the Umlauf Sculpture Garden with her family where she prayed with a bronze statue of a nun. LAURA SKELDING / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum. Family Day. Live music, yoga, stories and art-making. Free. Noon-4 p.m. Nov. 13. Kids Kraft. Make ecofriendly sculpture. $15. 9 a.m. Nov. 19 for kindergarten-second grade; 11 a.m. 3-5 grade. Umlauf Sculpture Garden, 605 Robert E. Lee Road. umlaufsculpture.org

Theater

“Charlotte’s Web.” Aerial artists Sky Candy bring the spider to life. 2 p.m. Nov. 5-6, 12-13, 19-20, 25-27, Dec. 3; 11 a.m. Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26 and Dec. 3. $16-$21. Zach Theatre’s Kleberg Theatre, 1421 W. Riverside Drive. zachtheatre.org.

“Whether the Weather.” Pollyanna Theatre Company presents this weather inspired play for ages 18 months to 4 years. $6.50. 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nov. 9-12, Nov. 16-19, Long Center. 701 Riverside Drive. thelongcenter.org.

“Annie.” See the classic musical. $99-$29. 8 p.m. Nov. 25-26, 2 p.m. Nov. 26. Long Center. 701 Riverside Drive. thelongcenter.org.

Movies

The Alamo Drafthouse. “Trolls Family Party” 10:35 a.m. Nov. 5, Slaughter Lane. Alamo for All sensory-friendly family movies. “Miss Peregrines Home for Peculiar Children.” 11:25 a.m. Nov. 1, Lakeline; 11:40 a.m. Nov. 1, Slaughter Lane; and 12:50 p.m. Nov. 1, South Lamar. “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.” 12:20 p.m. Nov. 19, Lakeline. drafthouse.com.

 

Books

Head to the children’'s tent of the Texas Book Festival in October. Ralph Barrera/AMERICAN-STATESMAN
Head to the children’’s tent of the Texas Book Festival.
Ralph Barrera/AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Texas Book Festival. Hear a story from favorite authors and get them to sign your books. Free. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 5-6. Texas State Capitol. texasbookfestival.org

BookPeople events. Betsy Devany reads “Lucy’s Lovey.” 2 p.m. Nov. 13. April and Amy story time. 10:30 a.m. Nov. 1. Baby Signs story time. 10:30 a.m. Nov. 2. Blast from the Past story time. 11:30 a.m. Nov. 5. Milly McSilly story time. 10:30 a.m. Nov. 8. Ms. Staci story time. 10:30 a.m. Nov. 9. Bundy Renfro reads story time. 11:30 a.m. Nov. 12. Armstrong Music School story time. 10:30 a.m. Nov. 15. Tiny Tails to You Petting Zoo. 10:30 a.m. Nov. 16. Paramount Theatre story time. 11:30 a.m. Nov. 19. Favorite Characters story time. 10:30 a.m. Nov. 22. Best Friends Forever story time. 11:30 a.m. Nov. 26. Brand New Books story time. 10:30 a.m. Nov. 29. Preposterous Puppet Show Players story time. 10:30 a.m. Nov. 30. BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd. bookpeople.com.

Barnes & Noble Events: Meet the Maker Different makers show you how they work. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Nov. 5-Nov. 6, all locations. 11 a.m. Saturday story times at all locations: “Footloose,” Nov. 5; “Penguin Problems,” Nov. 12; Thanksgiving, Nov. 19; “Moana and the Ocean,” Nov. 26.

At the library

Sew Happy. For kids 10 and up. 5 p.m. Nov. 1. Manchaca Road Branch.

Tween and Teen Steam. For kids 10 and up. 5 p.m. Nov. 1 and Nov. 15. University Hills Branch.

What’s Your Story? NaNoWriMo for Youth. 5:30 p.m. Nov. 1 and Nov. 15, Faulk Central Library.

Art Smart. 6 p.m. Nov. 1, 8, 15, 22 Willie Mae Kirk Branch.

Dia de lost Muertos. 6 p.m. Nov. 1, Willie Mae Kirk Branch; 5:30 p.m. Nov. 2, Cepeda Branch.

Everybody Dance Now: Singin’ and Swingin’ Through the Ages. 2 p.m. Nov. 2, Old Quarry Branch.

Crafternoon. 3 p.m. Nov. 3, Carver Branch; 4 p.m. Nov. 10, Twin Oaks Branch; 3:30 p.m. Nov. 15, Howson Branch.

Book Circle. 3:30 p.m. Nov. 3, Yarborough Branch; 3:30 p.m. Nov. 15, Twin Oaks Branch; 3:30 p.m. Nov. 17, Yarborough Branch.

Music & Movement. 11 a.m. Nov. 4, Milwood Branch; 11:30 a.m. Nov. 9, Manchaca Road Branch; 11 a.m. Nov. 18, Howson Branch.

Bow Wow Reading with Bonnie the Dog. 3:30 p.m. Nov. 10, North Village Branch; 11:30 a.m. Nov. 5, 12, 19 and 26 Yarborough Branch.

Made with Code. 1 p.m. Nov. 5, Carver Branch; 1 p.m. Nov. 12, Cepeda Branch.

Badgerdog Creating Writing Workshops: Stealing a Fairy Tale. 1:30 p.m. Nov. 5, Terrazas Branch.

STEAM Saturdays. For ages 7 and up. 2 p.m. Nov. 5. Little Walnut Creek Branch.

Band Books. Hear Echo and the Bats and see authors Yuyi Morales and R.L. Stein. 7-9 p.m. Nov. 5. Terrazas Branch.

Literature Live! Presents “The Nutcracker.” 2 p.m. Nov. 6, Faulk Central Library; 3:30 p.m. Nov. 7, Spicewood Springs Branch; 4:30 p.m. Nov. 15, Walnut Creek Branch; 3:30 p.m. Nov. 16, North Village Branch; 3:30 p.m. Nov. 17, Yarborough Branch; 6 p.m. Nov. 28, Carver Branch: 3:30 p.m. Nov. 29, Twin Oaks Branch; 10:15 p.m. Nov. 30, Southeast Branch.

NBTween Book Club, “The Wild Robot,” 4 p.m. Nov. 9, Howson Branch; “The Book With No Pictures,” 6 p.m. Nov. 16, Yarborough Branch; “The War that Saved My Life,” 6 p.m. Nov. 17, Twin Oaks Branch; “Space Dumplins,” 6 p.m. Nov. 30, Spicewood Springs Branch.

Teen Geek Night for ages 12 and up. 5 p.m. Nov. 9, University Hills Branch;

Felt Friends World Tour: Owl. 4:30 p.m. Nov. 10, Carver Branch; 6 p.m. Nov. 16, Faulk Central Library;

Teen Book Club: “Throne of Glass.” 7 p.m. Nov. 10, Yarborough Branch; “The Book Thief,” 6:30 p.m. Nov. 15, Howson Branch.

Storybook Dance Making. 2 p.m. Nov. 13, Recycled Reads Bookstore.

T(w)een STEM Lab. For ages 7 and up. 3 p.m. Nov. 16, Carver Branch.

Manga Book Club “Hellsing.” 5 p.m. Nov. 16, University Hills Branch.

Mother-Daughter Book Club “Raymie Nightengale.” 6 p.m. Nov. 16, Hampton Branch.

The Best Nest Family Book Club “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” 6 p.m. Nov. 17, Faulk Central Library.

Teen Book Club “Relish.” 6:30 p.m. Nov. 17, Spicewood Springs Branch.

Perler Bead Palooza. 2 p.m. Nov. 20, Faulk Central Library.

Pecan Street Brass. 2 p.m. Nov. 20, Recycled Reads Bookstore.

Family Movie Matinee: “Finding Dory.” 4 p.m. Nov. 29, Cepeda Branch; “BFG,” 5:30 p.m. Nov. 30, Carver Branch.

Have a family event we should know about? Email nvillalpando@statesman.com.

Emily Roberts to tell girls “Express Yourself” at We Are Girls Conference

Emily Roberts is the founder of The Guidance Girl website and the author of "Express Yourself."
Emily Roberts is the founder of The Guidance Girl website and the author of “Express Yourself.”

Emily Roberts created her website The Guidance Girl and her book “Express Yourself: A Teen Girl’s Guide to Speaking Up and Being Who You Are” to give the kind of advice she would have loved to have growing up around the Austin area and going to Dripping Springs High School.

Now 33, the psychotherapist with a masters degree from St. Edward’s University, splits her time between Austin and New York, where she runs therapy groups for girls. She’ll be in town Nov. 5 as a keynote speaker at the We Are Girls Conference from Girls Empowerment Network, GEN Austin. About 2,000 girls in third through eighth grades are expected to attend the all-day event at Austin High School.

Roberts’ message to girls is clear: Stop being afraid to speak up for yourself. To do that she gives girls tools and language to use in “Express Yourself.”

"Express Yourself: A Teen Girls' Guide to Speaking Up and Being Who You Are" by Emily Roberts.
Emily Roberts wrote “Express Yourself” to give girls tools on how to talk to others.

The book came after working as a therapist in Austin and seeing what girls were facing. She calls herself “more of a mentor than a traditional therapist.” She found that girls were trusting her and letting her into their world, but she says “it’s not a place you want to be at their age.”

She wanted to help change the world when it came to what girls were experiencing, but to do that, she says, “I needed a bigger platform to make the change I wanted to make.”

She moved to New York to take courses on writing and social media. And she also started working with girls in individual and group therapy settings there, too.

She created a her blog to provide information to girls about how to be confident and to help their parents navigate what was going on in their daughters’ world both real and virtual.

The more she wrote, the more she saw that the resources girls had were not effective. Girls didn’t know how to stand up for themselves. They worried about losing friends if they disagreed. They worried about feeling left out or not fitting in because of thoughts they saw as unique to them. They didn’t know how to negotiate with other girls or with boys. They felt anxious about it all.

They went to bed at night feeling guilty that they did not express themselves, that they were not confident.

“I made it my goal to have these conversations,” Roberts says. “Here are a few different tools so you can say what you need.”

She teaches girls that it’s OK to have emotions, but you need to know how to process those emotions, somthing that often isn’t taught. “The key is finding your power, your authenticity,” she says.

Often, girls know what they need to do. Roberts says she often bites her tongue and lets them answer their own questions. “You’ve got to give them the room to figure it out,” she says.

One of the biggest lessons she teaches is how to handle texting and social media. “It’s your reputation,” she says. “Pause before you press send, pause before you post, put the phone down, it’s the most powerful thing you can do.”

PAUSE is also an acronym:

P: Put down the phone or the mouse for just a second.

A: Ask yourself what your intention — your desired result — is for what you’re about to text or post. Is the intention a positive one or a negative one?

U: Urge surf. Just like a wave comes crashing down, an urge will lose its momentum if you give it a moment, and then you’ll be able to think more clearly.

S: Say it out loud. Other people will hear your comment as if it’s in your voice. Try it with a mean tone and then with a nicer tone. Which way do you think it will be heard?

E: Edit. Before pressing send, make any changes you need to make to your message in order to be clearly understood. Add an emoticon to indicate your tone, delete words that are too forceful, or delete the whole message and start over.

Even though her book is geared towards preteen and teenage girls, a lot of adults could use this advice, too.

When she goes to schools or groups and gives talks, she often asks for girls to write down questions they have. One of the questions that she gets is “how do I get my mom off the phone?”  She also gets: “My mom drives and texts but gets mad at me when I remind her not to.” Or “What do I do when I can’t get my mom to hear me?”

You see, parents are multitaskers, “and moms are the best multitaskers in the planet,” Roberts says, but kids need physical signs that you are listening to them. They need you to give them undivided attention.

 

We Are Girls Conference

When: 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Nov. 5

Where: Austin High School, 1715 W. Cesar Chavez St.

Tickets: $30 for girls grades 3-8 and their parents

Information: genaustin.org

American Academy of Pediatrics gets rid of two-hour limit to screen time in new policy

Turn this Ben Villalpando  ...
Ben Villalpando got his first cellphone when he was 11.

Parents, listen up. The American Academy of Pediatrics’ media use policy just got a little easier to understand and probably a little easier to actually do.

The biggest change is the amount of recommended time kids can use media. Before, the Academy recommended less than two hours a day of screen use of any kind and no screen use before age 2.

The new policy, which was released on Friday at the academy’s national conference recognizes that there’s a difference between using a computer, tablet or smartphone to do homework and playing mindless games on a smartphone. And it also recognizes that there is a difference between toddlers, preschoolers and school-aged kids.

Here are the recommendations:

  • Children younger than 18 months of age: Avoid the use of any screen media except video chatting (with grandparents, for example).
  • Children ages 18 months to 24 months: Introduce high-quality programs or apps, but do it with your children to create a dialog about what they are seeing and how it relates to the world around them.
  • Children ages 2 to 5 years: Limit screen time to one hour a day of high-quality programs that you view with your children.
  • Children ages six and older, place consistent limits on time spent using media, the types of media and make sure that the use of media does not take the place of sleeping, exercise and other healthy behaviors.
  • Designate media-free times together such as during dinner or while driving as well as media-free locations at home such as bedrooms.
  • Have ongoing conversations about what it means to be a good citizen and be safe online and offline.

The Academy recommends going to CommonSenseMedia.org and SesameStreetWorkshop.org to find recommendations for good use of screens.

The new policy does not set a limit for those ages 6 years on up, but recognizes that sleep and exercise should be the priority. To help parents do that, the Academy has launched the HealthyChildren.org/MediaUsePlan. There you can find a calculator to determine the amount of screen time your child could have. It automatically sets the amount of sleep your child needs based on age and the hour of exercise your child needs. Then you can add time for school, showering, meals, homework, chores, afterschool activities, reading, family time and other activities. My teenagers’ screen time quickly shrank to an hour and a half a day.

You can also create your family media plan, which allows you to set the screen-free zones (their bedrooms and the dinner table) and the time at which screens have to be turned into their parents (an hour before bed is recommended). It also sets the rules: will you only use screens together? Or if they can use it alone, are there sites or apps they are not allowed to us?

It also talks about the importance of decreasing screen time and how you can accomplish this: sleeping more, doing hobbies, reading, being with friends, doing sports or anything else you want to add.

The rest of the plan talks about being good media members, being a good digital citizen and being safe. Recommended rules already are suggested, but you can also add your own rules.

The final step is how your child is going to guarantee that he or she gets enough sleep and exercise.

While there’s one family plan, you can set different limits and rules for each kid. At the end of making this plan, you can print it out and put it on your refrigerator. And for those really glued-to-their screen kids, you can send them the screen shot.

Dr. Ari Brown of 411 Pediatrics.
Dr. Ari Brown of 411 Pediatrics.

Dr. Ari Brown, of 411 Pediatrics and the book “Baby 411,” was in San Francisco at the Academy’s conference, where she listened to a panel about the new recommendations.

What the policy does, she says, “is remove the time as the variable that you’re focusing on. It’s not just the time, it’s what your child is doing with their media use. That’s what we’re trying to get parents to be more aware of.”

It also prioritizes sleep and exercise as well as interaction with real people.

The new policy, Brown says, is going to be easier for parents because it’s personalized. “What we were offering as far as advice was way too simplistic,” she says. Also simply saying, “no more than two hours a day of any and all screen time” had parents throwing up their hands and giving up. This puts value in offline activities such as family time, dinner time and social interaction, but allows for screen time after all the things you value as a family are done, Brown says.

The key to all of this is setting important limits: screen-free times to be a family and screen-free bedrooms. Many studies have concluded that family dinner time as well as not going to bed with a screen make a big difference on kids’ behavior. Family dinner time is all about making a kid feel valued and connected. The no-phone in the bedroom is all about sleep. The light from the phone or tablet makes falling asleep difficult, and you cannot control what time your child’s friends decide to start texting them at night. (My kids regularly get texts and social media messages from their friends at midnight, 2 a.m. and 3 a.m. If their phones lived in their rooms, our kids could be up all night. )

As far as that excuse that the phone is their alarm clock, Brown has this simple advice: “You can buy an alarm clock,” she says. “The phone doesn’t have to be your alarm clock and your phone can recharge downstairs in the kitchen.”

Being a parent to a child who is more advanced in technology than you can be hard, but this new policy makes it easier. “You don’t have to know the difference between trending and following,” Brown says. “You just have to have house rules for media use.”

And those rules apply to you, too, parents. Your children are watching when you don’t prioritize relationships and bring the phone to the dinner table or use it while driving.

For all kids, we need to remember that there is value in boredom. “It makes them problem solve and create and learn self-regulation,” Brown says.

Brown reminds of studies of young kids who have had a lot of access to screens. They have poor language skills and poor executive function, she says.

“If they have to use a screen to entertain their mind or to calm down, they are missing out on important growth opportunities.”

That means that you don’t hand them a phone or a tablet each time they seem bored or are having a tantrum. “We value unplugged play,” she says. “Unplugged play allows them to create and learn. We value that there are talk times that need to happen with the child and we know that when a screen is on, the parent is talking less to a child.”

And if you have that kid who has had a lot of screen time, this is your wake-up call to change that. “Being a parent is not a popular job,” Brown says. “You’re not your child’s friend. They won’t always love what you do, but they will always love you. You do have to set limits for your child, whether it’s media or sleep or what they eat.”

She challenges parents to take a family screen-free holiday for a day or weekend. It’s a scary, daunting task, but then families often realize how much more fun they have together.

Find more articles about screen time:

Kids attached to their screens

Mentor not monitor kids’ screen use

Kids addicted to screens

Monitor kids’ screen use

Set up a screen time contract

So much fun stuff to do in Austin with kids this weekend, Oct. 21-23

Of course, we’ll be at the Taylor Swift concert, but if you aren’t heading to Circuit of the America’s here’s some other things to do with the family this weekend:

Friday

Monstober: Frankenfigures. 4 p.m. Friday, Twin Oaks Branch; Die-oramas, 5 p.m. Friday, University Hills Branch.

Texas Museum of Science & Technology Star Party. Every Friday in October, look at the stars in the parking lot. 8 p.m. Fridays. Texas Museum of Science & Technology, 1220 Toro Grande Drive, Cedar Park. txmost.org.

Friday-Saturday

The Austin Zoo puts on Boo at the Zoo next month. DEBORAH CANNON / AMERICAN-STATESMAN
The Austin Zoo puts on Boo at the Zoo this month. DEBORAH CANNON / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Boo at the Zoo. Dress up and enjoy the zoo with Halloween-themed activities. 6:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays in October. $15. Austin Zoo, 10808 Rawhide Trail. austinzoo.org

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

Saturday

Chase Johnson had to do a five-day seizure study at Dell Children's Medical Center. He kept up with his school work by Skyping with his class. Johnson Family photo
Chase Johnson had to do a five-day seizure study at Dell Children’s Medical Center. He kept up with his school work by Skyping with his class. Johnson Family photo

Chase for the Cure Hoop-a-thon and Skills Challenge. Help raise awareness about epilepsy and send kids to camp. $5 to participate in the Hoop-a-thon; $15 for skills challenge participants. 1-5 p.m. Saturday. Dripping Springs High School gyms, 940 W. U.S. 290, Dripping Springs. chaseforthecure.net

Science Saturday Hallow-Steam with exploding pumpkins, Austin Reptile Shows, laboratories and creepy activities. Costumes encouraged. Noon-6 p.m. Saturday. Texas Museum of Science & Technology, 1220 Toro Grande Drive, Cedar Park. txmost.org.

Baby Bloomers for kids infant to 3. Learn about  farm harvests, 9 a.m. Saturday. $4.50. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. Thinkeryaustin.org.

BookPeople story times. Anna Westbrook reads, 11:30 a.m. Saturday. BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd. bookpeople.com.

Barnes & Noble 11 a.m. Saturday story times at all locations: Halloween, Saturday.

Made with Code. 1 p.m. Saturday, Hampton Branch.

ReUse & Fix It Festival. Noon, Saturday Recycled Reads Bookstore.

Monster Mash Bash. 2 p.m. Saturday, Twin Oaks Branch.

Saturday-Sunday

Barton Hill Farms in Bastrop opened its Willie Nelson-themed corn maze for the season. You ll find a pumpkin patch, farm animals, face painting, a 2,000-square-foot jumping pillow, a train and food from Cindy s Gone Hog Wild restaurant. Photos: Barton Hill Farms
Barton Hill Farms in Bastrop opened its Lonesome Dove-themed corn maze for the season. 
Photos: Barton Hill Farms

Barton Hill Farms fall festival. Find a lot to do including the maze in the shape of Lonesome Dove, live music, pumpkin painting, train rides and more. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. Through Nov. 13. $11 adults, $8 3-10 years old, free for children 2 and younger. $1 off online. Barton Hill Farms, 1115 FM 969, Bastrop. bartonhillfarms.com.

Thinkery workshops: Whisks & Wizards for kids 4 and older. Create magic in the kitchen. 11:15 a.m., 1:15 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $8 child, $8 adult. Superhero capes for ages 4 and older. 11:15 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. $8 child, $8 adult. Sewn Circuits for ages 8 and up. Make light-up embroidery. 1:15 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $8. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. Thinkeryaustin.org.

“Rosita y Conchita.” See this bilingual Día de los Muertos play about two sisters who try to reunite. $8-$12. 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Scottish Rite Theater, 207 W. 18th St. scottishritetheater.org.

“Charlotte’s Web.” Aerial artists Sky Candy bring the spider to life. 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. $16-$21. Zach Theatre’s Kleberg Theatre, 1421 W. Riverside Drive. zachtheatre.org.

Sunday

Austin Symphony s "Halloween Children's Concert will turn Dell Hall into a place where spooky music and characters roam, but not in a scary way. Credit: 2011 Austin Symphony Orchestra
Austin Symphony s “Halloween Children’s Concert will turn Dell Hall into a place where spooky music and characters roam, but not in a scary way.
Credit: 2011 Austin Symphony Orchestra

Halloween Concert. Hear Halloween-themed music from the Austin Symphony. $10-$15. 3 p.m. Sunday. Long Center. 701 Riverside Drive. austinsymphony.org.

BookPeople events. Donna Janell Bowman reads “Step Right Up,” 3 p.m. Sunday. BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd. bookpeople.com.

Theater review: Zach Theatre’s “Charlotte’s Web” puts bluegrass spin on E.B. White classic

"Charlotte's Web" is at Zach Theatre through Dec. 3. Winnie Hsia from Sky Candy plays Charlotte. Kirk Tuck
“Charlotte’s Web” is at Zach Theatre through Dec. 3. Winnie Hsia from Sky Candy plays Charlotte. Kirk Tuck

“Terrific,” “Radiant,” “Humble,” “Some Pig.” These words, which the character of Charlotte spins into her web in “Charlotte’s Web,” could easily describe the production at Zach Theatre. On stage through Dec. 3, the production was adapted from the E.B. White book by Joseph Robinette, and directed by Zach’s Education Director Nat Miller with musical direction by Allen Robertson.

Robertson, who was one half of the KLRU kids’ show “The Biscuit Brothers,” works with the other Biscuit Brother Jerome Schoolar, as well as Amanda Clifton, Amber Quick and  Joseph Quintana, to create the bluegrass band that furnishes the preshow and show music. The band plays humble, old-fashioned hymns including “I’ll Fly Away,” and “Will the Circle by Unbroken.” The songs set the stage perfectly of a humble farm where an extraordinary pig, Wilbur, is born.

The musicians in the band do double duty as the Zuckerman family, farmhands and county fair participants as well as the animals on the farm: Sheep, Goose and Gander, and Templeton, the rat. Simple costume changes and movement help the audience quickly switch from seeing human to seeing animal. The actors for Wilbur, the pig, (in Thursday morning’s 10 a.m. show played by Diego Rodriguez) and his human champion, Fern (played in this show by Mariela Denson), also join the band between scenes.

The clear star of this show is Charlotte, played by Sky Candy Aerial & Circus Arts’ Winnie Hsia. For all of the show’s simplicity, Hsia creates wonder in the weaving of the letters into the spider’s web. Each time she weaves, Hsia does one death-defying trick after another while the audience watches each letter be written in an illuminated sign above the metal web. It is magical.

For a show that lets audience see the characters change, these letters are the one secret hidden from the audience that captivated the first-grade students that were in the audience at our viewing.

Bits of physical humor including Wilbur trying to show Charlotte that he is radiant by dancing; Wilbur trying to escape the farmer and farmhand; a cocky, much larger pig at the fair; and the support cast of farm animals, also kept this normally squirmy audience engaged in the hour-long show.

Even though this is not a show that Zach Theatre wrote for the stage, it put its own spin on the show by the using an aerialist as the spider to creating a bluegrass band and playing hymns, instead of the original Broadway musical’s production numbers. That makes it “Some Show.”

“Charlotte’s Web”

When: 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 29-30, Nov. 5-6, 12-13, 19-20, 25-27, Dec. 3; 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26 and Dec. 3

Where: Zach Theatre’s Kleberg Theatre, 1421 W. Riverside Drive

Tickets: $16-$21

Information: zachtheatre.org.

 

 

12 days of Halloween: Something festive to do in Austin with families, each day

 

Thursday, Oct. 20

The Austin Zoo puts on Boo at the Zoo next month. DEBORAH CANNON / AMERICAN-STATESMAN
The Austin Zoo puts on Boo at the Zoo. DEBORAH CANNON / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Austin Recreation Center Halloween Carnivals. 5:30 p.m. Oct. 20, Metz.

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

Robot Uprising, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Willie Mae Kirk Branch; Die-oramas, 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Carver Branch.

Monster Movies, Stop Motion Animation. 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Windsor Park Branch.

Friday Oct. 21

Monstober: Frankenfigures. 4 p.m. Friday, Twin Oaks Branch; Die-oramas, 5 p.m. Friday, University Hills Branch.

Boo at the Zoo. Dress up and enjoy the zoo with Halloween-themed activities. 6:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays in October. $15. Austin Zoo, 10808 Rawhide Trail. austinzoo.org

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

Saturday, Oct. 22

“Rosita y Conchita.” See this bilingual Día de los Muertos play about two sisters who try to reunite. $8-$12. 11 a.m. Saturday and Oct. 23 and 30. Scottish Rite Theater, 207 W. 18th St. scottishritetheater.org.

Boo at the Zoo. Dress up and enjoy the zoo with Halloween-themed activities. 6:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays in October. $15. Austin Zoo, 10808 Rawhide Trail. austinzoo.org

Barton Hill Farms fall festival. Find a lot to do including the maze in the shape of Lonesome Dove, live music, pumpkin painting, train rides and more. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. Through Nov. 13. $11 adults, $8 3-10 years old, free for children 2 and younger. $1 off online. Barton Hill Farms, 1115 FM 969, Bastrop. bartonhillfarms.com.

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

Science Saturday Hallow-Steam with exploding pumpkins, Austin Reptile Shows, laboratories and creepy activities. Costumes encouraged. Noon-6 p.m. Saturday. Texas Museum of Science & Technology, 1220 Toro Grande Drive, Cedar Park. txmost.org.

Thinkery workshops: Superhero capes for ages 4 and older. 11:15 a.m. Saturday. $8 child, $8 adult. Sewn Circuits for ages 8 and up. Make light-up embroidery. 1:15 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Saturday. $8. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. Thinkeryaustin.org.

Monster Mash Bash. 2 p.m. Saturday, Twin Oaks Branch.

Barnes & Noble 11 a.m. Saturday story times at all locations: Halloween, Oct. 22.

Sunday, Oct. 23

Austin Symphony s "Halloween Children's Concert  will turn Dell Hall into a place where spooky music and characters roam, but not in a scary way. Credit: 2011 Austin Symphony Orchestra
Austin Symphony’s “Halloween Children’s Concert will turn Dell Hall into a place where spooky music and characters roam, but not in a scary way.
Credit: 2011 Austin Symphony Orchestra

Halloween Concert. Hear Halloween-themed music from the Austin Symphony. $10-$15. 3 p.m. Sunday. Long Center. 701 Riverside Drive. austinsymphony.org.

“Rosita y Conchita.” See this bilingual Día de los Muertos play about two sisters who try to reunite. $8-$12. Sunday and Oct. 30. Scottish Rite Theater, 207 W. 18th St. scottishritetheater.org.

Barton Hill Farms fall festival. Find a lot to do including the maze in the shape of Lonesome Dove, live music, pumpkin painting, train rides and more. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. Through Nov. 13. $11 adults, $8 3-10 years old, free for children 2 and younger. $1 off online. Barton Hill Farms, 1115 FM 969, Bastrop. bartonhillfarms.com.

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

Thinkery workshops: Superhero capes for ages 4 and older. 11:15 a.m. Saturday. $8 child, $8 adult. Sewn Circuits for ages 8 and up. Make light-up embroidery. 1:15 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Saturday. $8. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. Thinkeryaustin.org.

Monday, Oct. 24

Monstober: Frankenfigures. 4 p.m. Monday, Ruiz Branch.

Twas A Dark and Stormy Night” concert. Seminary of the Southwest music director Kevin McClure and friends present this family friendly. Free. 7 p.m. Monday. Christ Chapel, Duval Street and Rathervue Place. ssw.edu/event/twas-dark-stormy-night-concert

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

Tuesday, Oct. 25

"Beetlejuice" is playing Flix Brewhouse.
“Beetlejuice” is playing Flix Brewhouse.

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

“Beetlejuice.” See the classic Halloween tale. $5. 7 p.m. Tuesday. Flix Brewhouse, 2200 S. Interstate 35, Suite B1, Round Rock.flixbrewhouse.com.

Wednesday, Oct. 26

Monstober: Frankenfigures. 5 p.m. Wednesday, University Hills Branch.

Thursday, Oct. 27

Recreation Center Halloween Carnivals. 6 p.m. Thursday, Givens; 6 p.m. Thursday, South Austin.

Monstober: Frankenfigures. 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Windsor Park Branch; Die-oramas, 4 p.m. Thursday, Cepeda Branch.

Monster Movies, Stop Motion Animation. 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Carver Branch.

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

Día de los Muertos. 10:15 a.m. Thursday, Windsor Park Branch; 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Southeast Branch.

Glow-in-the-Dark Costume Dance Party. 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Yarborough Branch.

Friday, Oct. 28
Bullock Museum.
 Spooktacular. Come dressed in costume and enjoy spooky science, “Toy Story of Terror” and ghosts of the pirate ship La Belle. 5 p.m. Friday. Bullock Museum, 1800 N. Congress Ave. thestoryoftexas.com.

Family Night: Halloween Hootenanny. Many Halloween activities for the whole family to try. 6-9 p.m. Friday. $13-$15. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. Thinkeryaustin.org.

Recreation Center Halloween Carnivals. 3:30 p.m. Friday, Cantu; 6 p.m. Friday, Dottie Jordan.

Día de los Muertos. 10:30 a.m. Friday, Faulk Central Library.

Boo at the Zoo. Dress up and enjoy the zoo with Halloween-themed activities. 6:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays in October. $15. Austin Zoo, 10808 Rawhide Trail. austinzoo.org

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

Thinkery Workshops: Whisks & Wizards for kids 4 and older. Create magic in the kitchen. 11:15 a.m., 1:15 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Saturday. $8 child, $8 adult. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. Thinkeryaustin.org.

Saturday, Oct. 29

Monstober: Socktober Fest; 2 p.m. Saturday, Ruiz Branch.

Saturday Movie Matinee, “ “Goosebumps,” 2 p.m. Saturday, University Hills Branch.

Recreation Center Halloween Carnivals. 1 p.m. Saturday, Delores Duffie; 6 p.m. Saturday, Dittmar.

BookPeople Storytime: Monster Mash, 11:30 a.m. Saturday. BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd. bookpeople.com.

Boo at the Zoo. Dress up and enjoy the zoo with Halloween-themed activities. 6:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays in October. $15. Austin Zoo, 10808 Rawhide Trail. austinzoo.org

Barton Hill Farms fall festival. Find a lot to do including the maze in the shape of Lonesome Dove, live music, pumpkin painting, train rides and more. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. Through Nov. 13. $11 adults, $8 3-10 years old, free for children 2 and younger. $1 off online. Barton Hill Farms, 1115 FM 969, Bastrop. bartonhillfarms.com.

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

Thinkery Workshops: Whisks & Wizards for kids 4 and older. Create magic in the kitchen. 11:15 a.m., 1:15 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. Sunday. $8 child, $8 adult. Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave. Thinkeryaustin.org.

The Alamo Drafthouse. “PBS Kids: Halloween Special.” 10 a.m. Saturday, Lakeline and Slaughter Lane. Reserve tickets for $1-$3 donation online. drafthouse.com.

“Rosita y Conchita” is a bilingual Día de los Muertos play at Scottish Rite Theater.
“Rosita y Conchita” is a bilingual Día de los Muertos play at Scottish Rite Theater.

Sunday, Oct. 30

“Rosita y Conchita.” See this bilingual Día de los Muertos play about two sisters who try to reunite. $8-$12. Sunday. Scottish Rite Theater, 207 W. 18th St. scottishritetheater.org.

Barton Hill Farms fall festival. Find a lot to do including the maze in the shape of Lonesome Dove, live music, pumpkin painting, train rides and more. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. Through Nov. 13. $11 adults, $8 3-10 years old, free for children 2 and younger. $1 off online. Barton Hill Farms, 1115 FM 969, Bastrop. bartonhillfarms.com.

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

The Alamo Drafthouse. “PBS Kids: Halloween Special.” 10 a.m. Sunday, Lakeline and Slaughter Lane. Reserve tickets for $1-$3 donation online. drafthouse.com.

Monday, Oct. 31 (AKA Halloween)

Día de los Muertos. 6 p.m. Oct. 31, Carver Branch.

Sweet Berry Farm fall fun. The Texas-shaped hay maze and smaller candy corn hay maze are open through Nov. 6. You can also find hay rides, pumpkin decorating, a train and more. Priced per event. 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. 1801 FM 1980, Marble Falls. sweetberryfarm.com.

Safe Trick or Treating event. 6:30 p.m. Oct. 31. Free.  Continental retirement community, 4604 S. Lamar Blvd.

Safe Trick or Treating event. 5-8 p.m. Lakeline Mall. 4-6 p.m. San Marcos Premium Outlets. Participating stores have a pumpkin in the window.