Do you kiss your child on the mouth? Internet debate is on

Sarah Miller gives her son Luke Curtis Miller a kiss during his first birthday celebration at Veterans Park in Royal Palm Beach. Bruce R. Bennett/The Palm Beach Post

Sarah Miller gives her son Luke Curtis Miller a kiss during his first birthday celebration at Veterans Park in Royal Palm Beach. Bruce R. Bennett/The Palm Beach Post

There’s been a lot of conversation on social media about whether it is appropriate to kiss your child on the mouth or for them to kiss you on the mouth. The theory is that it is sends the wrong message and it is sexually inappropriate. Lips are for lovers, the anti-mouth kissing side touts. Read some of the discourse here.

I’m a 42-year-old woman who still kisses her father on the mouth and there’s nothing sexual about that. It’s just what we’ve always done.  Now my children, mostly we hug it out or it’s a peck on the cheek. I don’t know why that is, perhaps it’s actually the fear of germs that have been instilled on them and on me as a parent in this antibacterial everything world we now live in.

For us, kiss not kiss, not a big deal. I’m more focused on trying to make sure that my teenagers have clothes on when they step out of their bedrooms, and that I remember to knock on their doors and wait the obligatory three seconds before walking into their bedrooms. There are just some sights you can’t unsee.